Slavs and Tatars. Mirrors for Princes

This form of political writing often called "advice literature," shared by Christian and Muslim cultures alike, "mirrors for princes" attempted to elevate statecraft ("dawla") to the same level as faith/religion ("din") during the Middle Ages. These guides for future rulers—Machiavelli’s "The Prince" being a widely known example—addressed the delicate balance between seclusion and society, spirit and state, echoes of which we continue to find in the US, Europe, and the Middle East several centuries later. Today we suffer from the very opposite: there is no shortage of political commentary, but a notable lack of intelligent, eloquent discourse on the role of faith and the immaterial as a valuable agent in society or public life.

This publication brings together the writing of preeminent scholars and commentators using the genre of medieval advice literature as a starting point to discuss fate and fortune versus governance, advice for female nobility, and an Indian television drama as a form of translation of statecraft. The illustrated essays are accompanied by an interview with Slavs and Tatars.

Relevante Bücher: 
Autor/Herausgeber: 
Slavs and Tatars
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Autor/Herausgeber: 
Slavs and Tatars
JRP, 2015, 978-3037644072
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The Wire Issue 374

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Turning Inward

Relevante Bücher: 
Autor/Herausgeber: 
Lou Cantor, Clemens Jahn (Eds.)
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Autor/Herausgeber: 
Lou Cantor, Clemens Jahn (Eds.)
Sternberg Press, 2015, 978-3-95679-090-4
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Texte zur Kunst No. 97

Exile and marginality, network availability, mass- versus subcultural identities, privilege, opting (versus dropping) out – these are elements this issue takes on. The fading of bohemia’s appeal is no doubt linked in part to a growing preference for the web’s promise of total-connectivity. Though could another factor be at work here too: an underlying sense that perhaps the real displacement and disenfranchisement after which romantic notions of “bohemia” were later formed may again be a very real threat?

Contributions by: Diedrich Diederichsen, Douglas Coupland, Cornelia Koppetsch, Saskia Sassen, Noura Wedell, Stephan Dillemuth, Daniel Keller & Ella Plevin, Morag Keil, Enzo Camacho & Amy Lien, Christian Naujoks, Tess Edmonson, Jeff Rian, Mark von Schlegell, Kerstin Stakemeier, Nick Zedd, and others

EUR 15.00

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